Lo de “Manipulating postcolonial sensitivities” es contigo, Dilma

wallenberg-2008-desmond-tutu There can’t be many world figures today who speak with greater moral authority than the Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, Desmond Tutu. Today, he takes to the Wall Street Journal’s editorial page with a powerful plea on behalf of Leopoldo López and Venezuela’s other political prisoners, explicitly condemning the moral cowardice with which Latin American leaders have ducked the issue:

Mr. López recently completed his 16th month in jail for his role in helping organize the [2014] protests. This is not a criminal offense, and he should be a free man. He has advocated peaceful responses to injustice; he has urged the people of Venezuela to resolve their problems in accordance with the country’s constitution. Much as with other practitioners of nonviolence—Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr.—Mr. López is paying a high price for his pursuit of justice. Now that the hunger strike has ended, I urge the Maduro government to allow the Red Cross access to the 100 or so citizens who joined the hunger strike in solidarity.

During all this, Latin American leaders have been hiding behind excuses. When the U.S. in March imposed sanctions on human-rights violators in Venezuela, Latin American countries responded by adopting a resolution in support of the country, citing “the principle of nonintervention.”

I understand the trauma of colonialism. Yet without the international community, my home country of South Africa would have suffered a lot more bloodshed. It was the boycott and sanctions regime, coupled with internal resistance, that ended apartheid, the darkest chapter in South Africa’s history. The international community did not really mobilize, however, until after the 1960 Sharpeville Massacre, in which 69 people were murdered for protesting peacefully. The world should not wait for a similar massacre to take action in Venezuela.

The way to address the grave human-rights situation in Venezuela is not to protect the leaders who manipulate postcolonial sensitivities and history to maintain an iron grip on power. Latin America and the world must go beyond rhetoric. Governments must demand the immediate release of all political prisoners as an imperative to global engagement with Venezuela. It is also time for Latin American governments to work with multilateral institutions like the Organization for American States and the United Nations to demand that Venezuela respect the dignity and humanity of all its people. Their inaction gives Mr. Maduro license to act with impunity.

The message couldn’t be much clearer: nobody’s buying the crap you’re selling Dilma. Your rhetoric is decades past its sell-by date, Michelle. You stand alone with your cowardice, Cristina.

34 thoughts on “Lo de “Manipulating postcolonial sensitivities” es contigo, Dilma

    • That does not make her less of a Spineless Wench and a prodigious Thief. She certainly loved Chavez, and his Fraudmatic machines to steal elections at the last minute, that’s for sure. And she certainly adores Luladron and all the delicacies of Petrobras and Odebrecht, thus her complicit silence. much like Christina and the 3 Chupamedia Stooges Evo, Correa y Ortega.

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  1. “The message couldn’t be much clearer: nobody’s buying the crap you’re selling Dilma. Your rhetoric is decades past its sell-by date, Michelle. You stand alone with your cowardice, Cristina.”

    With the sole exception of Michelle, the other two won’t remain in power for long. It would be better to already start addressing their possible successors.

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  2. Thanks MR Tutu, now prepare to be insulted and called a lackey of the empire and the principal reason that apartheid lasted so long and whatever other BS that these dumb fellows launch on a daily basis.

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    • Wow, didn’t see that one coming:

      “In siding with the Venezuelan Right, Mr. Tutu has tragically aligned himself with the natural allies of the European settler elites in Tel Aviv and Johannesburg, a reality made all the clearer by the fact that Lopez is being legally represented by one of Canada’s foremost Zionist politicians.”

      http://venezuelanalysis.com/analysis/11415

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      • Well, frankly, that would be an absolutely wonderful piece to show around and say “see how right Mr Tutu was?”

        He is, morally, a giant, while the author of that bullshit just paints himself as a miserable antisemite.

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        • In fact, this miserable antisemite is himself a jew from Philadelphia who just happens to hate Israel. Yes, there are some of those, and Chavista on top of that when Chavismo is as antisemitic as they come.

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          • He was arrested for protesting against Israeli occupation which gave him psf credentials within Chavismo. His father is a huge psf in the States. Koerner is a Jacobin. A true believer in Communism. He’s quite at home at Venezuelanalysis.

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      • And who is behind the economic war? Why, obviously, it is the Jews!

        Only a matter of time. Should be worth a billion or two from Tehran.

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  3. A few days after Pepe Mujica left power he expressed this half-hearted support for Maduro with a 60s lefty conspiracy theory justification. Here we have a man that suffered torture in his time.

    Same for Dilma. She also suffered under the monstrous repressive forces of Brazil in the 70s yet she is unwilling to denounce Maduro’s government. Some will explain this under the guise of business interests.

    Even my euro socialist uncle is unwilling to categorically censor Maduro and for that matter Fidel.

    Somehow they fall into a reflexive anti colonialist frame of mind left over from the 60s. Somehow, the US is out there lurking to get us, and indeed preventing lefties form imposing their leftist utopia.

    Then there are all those Aporrea writers…

    It is something of a PTSD to the real interventions that they witnessed in their youth form Bay of Pigs to Panama. They find it safer to stick to whatever claims to be the left, even a corrupt and failing left.

    At the end of the day I believe it comes down to the poison of modern utilitarianism, “you must crack a few eggs to make an omelet”.

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    • Ironically, the infamous Gringo Empire is about to crush the poor Third World colonies yet again, with a little technological tool called Fracking.

      The entire balance of power is shifting right before our eyes. Opec, PetroCaribe, Caricom and even the Arabs are getting whipped again. With their own Devil’s Excrement, mind you. Gotta love it.

      Poor, subdued nations, victims of never-ending 18th Century Colonialism.. They wanted a “Guerra Economica? Well, careful what you wish for… Except this is legal, and well-deserved.

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      • The US is not in an economic war with Venezuela. Venezuela is in a war with itself. In the long run,the world needs every drop of oil produced.
        Venezuela is simply mismanaged. Blaming the US may be useful for the Maduro administration but it will not resolve any issues in Venezuela. Talking about the US exacting some kind of economic revenge is unproductive and just not true.

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    • “Same for Dilma. She also suffered under the monstrous repressive forces of Brazil in the 70s yet she is unwilling to denounce Maduro’s government. Some will explain this under the guise of business interests.”

      There’s a mith about Dilma that states that her extremely violent guerilla group that killed a lot of innocent people in the 60’s and 70’s had been “fighting for democracy” back then. But this has already been debunked by the former guerilla members themselves in the form of interviews and lots of evidence from that time that point to the blatant truth: they wanted to replace a far-right dictatorship with a far-left dictatorship. Yes, they didn’t want democracy, but communism.

      Thus, to see Dilma as a “freedom fighter” or “human rights warrior” or some sort of Gandhi or Mother Teresa back in the 70’s is a very big mistake, even more so because in a lot of ways the communists like her fighting the military dictatorship were even more cruel and reactionary than the Brazilian government itself in that time. Just think for a second that the Brazilian military, with all their power, killed 293 people (confirmed deaths), and communist groups like the one Dilma was part of killed 119 (confirmed deaths) – most of them being innocent people in bank robberies, kidnappings etc.

      When you understand that, it’s not very hard to understand why Dilma supports Maduro.

      Finally, let’s not forget that Dilma made everything in her reach to harm Honduras and Paraguay when Zelaya and Lugo were deposed, and she hurt Brazilian business interests by doing that, she went as far as expelling Paraguay from Mercosur… So, she’s not that concerned about “business interests”, is she?

      It’s an ideological thing. A “brothers in arms” thing, really.

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      • A similar mistake is made with Pepe Mujica and the Tupamaros. That the Tupamaros began their activities against a democratically elected government is a fact that has conveniently fallen down the rabbit hole. The Montoneros and the ERP in Argentina did commence their activities against a military government, but after Peron was elected, they continued their bombings, assassinations and kidnappings while simultaneously claiming to be Peronistas. Given that Juan Domingo tacitly accepted their support when the military was still in power, it could be said he got what he deserved.

        The Brazilian milicos killed only 293 in 20 years? That was about a month’s work for the Videla/Viola/Galtieri junta in Argentina.

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        • Excellent, BT, it’s very important to tell other people about these facts, because, as you know, these communists like to rewrite history as they please.

          During those big protests in Venezuela, in 2014, there were these black and white pictures portraying a young Dilma, a young Mujica et caterva as if they were democratic people.

          But the thing is, their problem with their governments were not with the “dictatorship” portion of the equation, but solely with the ideology of these dictatorships. They were totally fine with USSR or Cuba or China being brutal regimes back then. And still are!!!

          Regarding the milicos, it was a very benevolent dictatorship compared to what happened in the neighbourhood. And common crime was very low in Brazil back then, so it’s not rare to see people around longing for those days. What is kind of sad, really, because when you find people longing for a military dictatorship you can measure how messed up the present actually is.

          The leftists like to inflate the number of murdered by the regime to 424, because they sum the missing people as “murdered by the regime”, what is not accurate because there are evidence that many times these communist groups would kill their own people. But even if you take their number as true, it would still be a small number for a 20-year-old very well-armed military dictatorship indeed.

          By the way, some years ago a very respected Brazilian political blogger decided to catalogue the 119 (actually 120) murders perpetrated by terrorist groups like the one Dilma was part of, the link is here:

          http://veja.abril.com.br/blog/reinaldo/tag/mortos-pela-esquerda/

          He concludes that Dilma’s terrorist group was one of the most violent.

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          • “The leftists like to inflate the number of murdered by the regime to 424, because they sum the missing people as “murdered by the regime”…”

            That’s the same that’s been done with the so-called caracazo, where chavistas claim CAP himself headshot more than 10.000 poor pregnant single mothers from the humble slums, when what actually happened was that a bunch of armed malandro gangs came from said slums to burn the city and destroy all on their path.

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            • Come on. That is absolutely disingenous.

              What do you think those missing people are doing, hiding in Las Vegas as Elvis?

              The issue is not that the Latin American left was wrong to denounce the far right human right excesses. The issue is the cowardice the left leaders display when the same bullshit (and it doesnt have to come into a match of numbers, ONE political prisoner is too many) happens under a left government.

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          • But the thing is, their problem with their governments were not with the “dictatorship” portion of the equation, but solely with the ideology of these dictatorships. They were totally fine with USSR or Cuba or China being brutal regimes back then. And still are!!!

            V.S. Naipaul wrote a very prescient article on the Argentine left in 1972 , when the Dirty War was just simmering and not at full boil: The Corpse at the Iron Gate. He writes about a Third World Priest- of aristocratic origins- he met:

            And the father , abashed, explained that Peronism was really concerned with the development of the human spirit. Such a development had taken place in Cuba and China; in those countries they had turned their backs on the industrial society.

            That is about as good a definition of ideological insanity one can get: to claim that a totalitarian regime is “really concerned with the development of the human spirit.”

            Naipaul goes on to note that the left had a rather plastic attitude towards torture: “Depende de quién sea torturado. It depends on who is tortured.” Reading that, one is hardly surprised at the attitudes of the likes of Dilma and Pepe towards the regime in Venezuela. After all, there are no enemies on the left.

            Naipaul does go off the deep end when he makes some generalizations about sex and sexism in Argentine society, but when he simply listens a and records what he hears, he is priceless.

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            • Thanks for the V.S. Naipaul link, a great article it seems.

              “That is about as good a definition of ideological insanity one can get: to claim that a totalitarian regime is “really concerned with the development of the human spirit.”

              But sometimes some of them get regretful about their past, and decide to tell the whole story. This guy being interviewed on the video below is called Eduardo Jorge, he ran for president in the last Brazilian elections, he’s one of the founders of Dilma’s party, still a die hard socialist, obviously, but not very proud of his past as a guerrilla member fighting the military regime.

              At 0:19 the interviewer says: “Democracy as an ideal system…”

              He answers: “No, no, we were for dictatorship!”

              Interviewer: “Of the proletariat…”

              Eduardo Jorge: “Of the proletariat! We were against the military dictatorship, but we were for the proletarian dictatorship. Truth must be said completely, because sometimes I hear half-truths. Due to the fact that the military dictatorship oppressed us tremendously, people tend to think that in the left camp there weren’t things similar or even worst [than the military regime].

              There you have, fomer Dilma colleague admitting their intentions: to create a big Cuba. Although I think that there are a lot of people like this guy — truly repentant about what they did –, I don’t think that this ‘repentance’ can be automatically applied to them all. I don’t see Dilma ever doing a ‘mea culpa’ on her crimes and real intentions. I don’t think Mujica will ever do it either.

              Some can argue: “If that’s really accurate, why haven’t Dilma and Mujica become dictators of their countries when presidents?”

              Short answer: Because they can’t! For the reason that between what they want and what they can do goes a very long way, but give the right environment for them and see what happens…

              Those folks don’t believe in democracy (period).

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  4. Loathing of Western cultural emblems and Representative Leaders is a badge of revolutonary honour for people who take pride in their progressive credentials , In Latin America the feeling is compounded by a deeply layered resentment against the (US) Culture that made good while our own failed!! She wouldnt be taking that posiiton unless it held some appeal to at least part of her policitical constituency.!! She aims to please , moral principles be dammed,!

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  5. Incluiria al infeliz de Pepe Mujica during his tenure as president. How deplorable plethora of lefties-corrupted politicians is Latin America packed with. Oprobrium

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  6. And where do you leave Michelle? She was also tortured, by the ultra right wing Pinochet. Yet now allied with the commies she looks the other way. These LatAms presidents are a bunch of hypocrites. No solidarity with the students and the freedom fighters even for returning the favor to (the democratic) Venezuela’s open arms inmigration policies, when they were being persecuted. At least, as they show their ugly butt crack, now we really know painfully where we stand: ALONE. But thank you Mr Tutu for siding with freedom. With injustice. Was goes around comes around. In this lifetime.

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      • Of her torture, Bachelet said in 2004 that “it was nothing in comparison to what others suffered”.

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    • Just about ALL Presidents “look the other way”. Not just Michelle. I don’t know much about Chile at all, but last I heard they are doing quite well compared to the rest of Latin KleptoAmerica. Is she as bad as Dilma or Cristina? Don’t think so.

      All we see condemning the Chavista Populist Totalitarian Plague (CPTP) are EX-presidents, if you haven’t noticed. Only very few actual Presidents, like Uribe, have had the Cojones to openly criticize and stand against Chavez and his cheap Oil or other sweet bribes, full, personalized $$ suitcases..

      Or just look at all the European Presidents and Mighty Obama, right in the middle of the most glorious honeymoon with the Castro assassins, one of the worst Dictatorships, Zero Human Rights, this planet has ever seen.

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  7. What Michelle is this you were referring to? I thought it was Michelle Goguikian! Today is the anniversary of his record-profit sale of Banco de Venezuela to the Venezuelan government.

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