Aftermath in Uribana: Few answers, no closure

uribana03033It has been three weeks since the start of the Uribana Prison crisis, and two since its sadly tragic conclusion. To this date, 48 inmates have died. There’s already a new warden in charge, along with 300 new guards.

Until now, the official version remains the same: the inmates committed suicide by ingesting a combination of medication found in the prison’s infirmary, and alcohol. This was repeated during a TV interview by the head of the National Assembly’s Prisons Commission, chavista turncoat William Ojeda.

But some of the relatives of the deceased believe they were downright killed. The sister of one of them told Barquisimeto newspaper El Impulso that “…they were given the death penalty,” and that the Prisons Ministry refused to move his brother to a better hospital in Zulia State because he spoke ill of the government.

The former warden Julio Cesar Perez (whose treatment of inmates triggered the crisis) and twelve prison guards will be charged in court, yet it remains to be seen how this will match the official version of events. Prisons Minister Iris Varela has kept a low profile in recent days, but she came earlier in the week to Barquisimeto and apologized to the inmates’ relatives. Both the opposition and human rights groups have demanded her firing. She pushed back by attacking her critics and specially what she calls the “…malicious disinformation campaign that worships death.” (Does that mean us?)

In the last five years alone, more than 200 inmates have died inside Uribana Prison, and 700 have been injured, but even this can’t change the situation of our prison system. As Human Rights Watch Director for the Americas, Jose Miguel Vivanco asked “[h]ow many deaths have to occur so the Venezuelan government tackles the prison crisis seriously?”.

The answer remains unknown. Shockignly, so does the answer to another question: does the State knows where its prisoners are?

10 thoughts on “Aftermath in Uribana: Few answers, no closure

  1. Victim blaming, the most nausea-inducing trait of chavismo, at its best:

    “Los más osados asaltaron la enfermería en horas de la madrugada, CON LA INTENCIÓN DE PASAR UN BUEN RATO, haciendo una liga de medicamentos con alcohol absoluto y yodado, preparando un “coctel”, que posterior a su consumo le causaría la muerte a 47 personas e intoxicación a más de cien. ”

    http://elimpulso.com/articulo/desperto-el-monstruo-en-uribana

    And fosforito barking like a rabid dog at anything, doesn’t surprise me, I’ll save my opinion about her, it’s lower than South Park level speech there.

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  2. In honor of the extra star on the flag for Guayana, these heroes of Venezuela were simply reenacting Jonestown.
    The people of Guyana will now willing turn their country over to the Bolivarian Republic after this show of solidarity.

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  3. That’s right. The residents of Urbana have not learned how to mix their drugs and their alcohol.
    I hope Iris Varela is on the list that just passed the US Senate. She is a monstrosity, with unusual staying power in her position, I’d just add.

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  4. There’s no particular reason to believe the official version, given that they lie about everything else. These people were on a hunger strike due to mistreatment and abuse, and now they are dead. Survivors should be interviewed in safe circumstances, not subject to reprisals. Autopsies should be conducted by independent, preferably international, experts.

    There are a million valid questions, and Iris Varela’s say-so doesn’t cut it.

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    • ‘Jeffry A. House— Survivors should be interviewed in safe circumstances, not subject to reprisals. Autopsies should be conducted by independent, preferably international, experts’— don’t hold your breath.

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      • These are minimum requirements of justice in this case. If the authorities prefer to cover up their misfeasance, they face an added accusation of obstruction of justice. I don’t hold my breath, but if it isn’t done, an eventual legal proceeding is utterly possible. You can’t just slaughter people these days.

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  5. Until now, the official version remains the same: the inmates committed suicide by ingesting a combination of medication found in the prison’s infirmary, and alcohol.

    Undoubtedly the information-savvy inmates consulted the Venezuelan equivalent of the Physician’s Desk Reference to to find out what drugs had contraindications for alcohol. Undoubtedly such a volume is readily available in the prison library. This knowledge would then have to be correlated with what drugs were available in the prison’s infirmary, which is most likely suffering the same problem of stocking drugs which all pharmacies currently have in Venezuela. Decime otro de vaqueros, pues.

    Barbituates, which can be used to treat epilepsy, do not have good reactions with alcohol.

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    • Yes. Uribana prison appears to have the only stocked government-run dispensary in the nation. What amazing achievements this Bolivarian Revolution has produced.

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  6. “It doesn’t matter that the authority keeps failing and doing everything wrong, you have to shut up, respect and obey the authority!”

    That’s the idiotic brainwashing being broadcasted by the “communal” radio stations these days, the same sissy fit that the corpse and maburro used to do, screaming like imbeciles “you must respect me because I’m ~insert position here~, you piece of shit!”, sounding like whiny spoiled kids.

    It’s no different with fosforito mata gente, who as usual went ballistic after people flipped her out when she “apologized” and tried to trivialize the slaughter, blaming the dead as chaburros like so much to do.

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