Rule of Law … of the Jungle (updated)

The World Justice Project just came out with its Rule of Law 2011 Index (download the entire report here). As you can imagine, we’re doin’ hunky-dory.

The money quote:

“Venezuela ranks relatively well in terms of religious freedom (ranking 15th), accessibility of the civil courts (ranking 21st), and protection of labor rights (ranking 27th). However, it is the worst performer in the world in accountability and effective checks on executive power. Corruption appears to be widespread (ranking 54th), crime and violence are common (ranking 64th), government institutions are non-transparent, and the criminal justice system is ineffective and subject to political influence (ranking 66th). The country also displays serious flaws in guaranteeing respect for fundamental rights, in particular, freedom of opinion and expression, and the right to privacy. On the other hand, while the property rights of companies are generally weak, the property rights of ordinary people appear to receive significantly better protection.”

(Update: A previous version of this post identified the World Justice Project with the World Bank. The two are unaffiliated. HT: A reader.)

14 thoughts on “Rule of Law … of the Jungle (updated)

  1. As I understand it, revolutions don’t let laws or rights get in the way. Progress is more important! However, if accountability is a problem, maybe the revolution is not really a revolution because it’s not going anywhere.

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  2. “On the other hand, while the property rights of companies are generally weak, the property rights of ordinary people appear to receive significantly better protection.”

    I wish you guys could have seen the face of Franklin Brito’s ghost when he read that…

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  3. 66 countries only, so prob. most of the ones that are worse than Ven. are not there. North Korea, Eq. Guinea, etc.

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    • Guido, are you serious? Shouldn’t we try to measure ourselves against the better countries?

      Arturo probably thinks that you went a little bit too far “66 countries only…” What a mediocre point of view

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      • Errr.. yes, I am very serious.
        I am not saying that we are doing well, or that the report is false. 66% or so of the countries in the world are absent from that report, and we are not well, but, having followed HR reports for years and years, we are in paradise compared to Burma. Do you dispute that?

        Mediocre? Realistic. It is absurd to do a global ranking where most of countries are out. That fact does not means we need to improve and that our current govt. is not a plague.

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  4. “On the other hand, while the property rights of companies are generally weak, the property rights of ordinary people appear to receive significantly better protection.”

    With theft and robbery of all kinds rampant? With near zero resolution of such cases?
    With Venezuelan courts as they are? With inflation and CADIVI? With the rent and lease laws? With the “expropiaciones” that affect individually owned small businesses? With all the “invasiones”?

    Say, ON PAPER.

    I would say that the property rights of companies are weak, but they can still make themselves heard, unless it’s Simion Gorila with his trademark “Expropiese” or one of his top minions. But ordinary people’s rights are so much ink on paper in Venezuela.

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    • To actually have rights, you need to have the civic mentality, the civil society structure, the activist groups, and the government and non-government institutions that insure that there will always be interest and a response when something untoward happens. And at times when something of a dubious nature happens.

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  5. Amazing that you guys fret about what the WJP says and its rankings when we all know that things have not been any different…ever in Venezuela. Even after iindependencd or during the colonia. When has there evr been social justice in Venezuela? Maybe it’s starting now? as far as the tribunals go…..c’mon, you all know htat there has never been justice here for the little guy. Judges were always bougt and sold and still are. Complaints above government corruption – well there corruption in the private sector as well. In the last two years llok at the casas de bolsa, the housing rip offs, the Mexican credits and cuaota balón at the start of this century. Prisons have always been a nightmare. Now, all this has not happened in the last ten years – it’s been like this since the Republic was founded in 1811. The question is why has hardly anything changed? That’s what you should be fretting about – not the rankings of some washington based project run by the spawn of the Illuminati.

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    • So we suck, and it’s OK we suck because we sucked before? That’s your argument?
      No joda Arturo, you keep on demonstrating why you are considered a troll, time and again.
      Muchacho no es gente vale.

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    • Arturo, ok, I’ll bite: “why has hardly anything changed?” Why are the prisons *still* a nightmare? Wait, no. Why are prisons *worse* than ever before? Who would you say is *responsible* not just for the lack of improvement, but for the worsening? Look no further than chavez’s regime for the answer.

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      • And, who is responsible for not changing anything with a bunch of oil money that he has used to give to other countries and buy weapons and toys.

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